Photo 4 May 5 notes Various olives and some kind of garlic snack! (Les Halles, Narbonne, France)

Various olives and some kind of garlic snack! (Les Halles, Narbonne, France)

Photo 4 May 13 notes MORELS 8) (Les Halles, Narbonne, France)

MORELS 8) (Les Halles, Narbonne, France)

Photo 4 May 21 notes Monkfish, as ugly as it is delicious (Les Halles, Narbonne, France)

Monkfish, as ugly as it is delicious (Les Halles, Narbonne, France)

Photo 4 May 2 notes Macarons; chocolate, pistachio, lemon and strawberry (Les Halles, Narbonne, France)

Macarons; chocolate, pistachio, lemon and strawberry (Les Halles, Narbonne, France)

Photo 17 Apr 2 notes Homemade banana bread!

Homemade banana bread!

Text 2 Apr 4 notes Confit Byaldi (Ratatouille)

I. love. ratatouille. It is easily one of my favourite all time dishes and perhaps the ultimate icon of Provençal cuisine. A simple stew of tomatoes, onions, courgettes, aubergine and peppers with plenty of garlic and herbs is all there is to it but the flavours so intense and the different ways off assembling the dish mean it has a place everywhere from a quick lunch to fine dining.

The word “ratatouille” will instantly remind most people of the awesome Pixar movie of the same name, in which the traditionally peasant dish is elevated to a work of haute cuisine for the films finale. That dish is a genuine recipe, called “Confit byaldi”, tailored especially for the movie by French chef Michel Guérard. Based on a previous recipe created by American chef Thomas Keller for his three michelin starred and world-renowned restaurant The French Laundry, Pixar so loved the dish they created a film for it! It’s now a very popular variant of the dish, and in my opinion the most delicious, the process is a lot more involved than traditional ratatouille but it brings out the most incredible, intense flavours from such simple ingredients.

Spoiler: The power of confit byaldi!

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Photo 30 Mar 19 notes allyou-caneat:

Kumquat Marmalade Jam with Brie
via foodstuffs.
Text 28 Mar 2 notes Masterclass: Panna Cotta

Panna cotta literally means cooked cream, and that’s essentially what this classic Italian dessert from the northern region of Piedmont is: cream, milk and sugar and gelatin plus whatever flavourings you might want to add. Panna cotta is great flavoured with vanilla, fruit and spices. It’s as delicious as it is simple and perfect for a quick tutorial, the best of which I’ve found is this one from Italian chef Giallo Zafferano.

For a recipe in metric measurements try this one from British chef Jamie Oliver.

Text 27 Mar 2 notes Recipe Roundup: March ‘11

Here’s a roundup of all the recipes I’ve cooked and posted in the last month, enjoy!

Ballotine of Partridge, Creamy Garlic Mash and Ratatouille


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Tarte au Citron

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Sea Bass & Fennel with Dauphinoise Potatoes

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Confit Tomatoes

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Pan fried scallops with pea & coconut velouté

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Summer Minestrone With Fresh Basil

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Pistachio and Olive Oil Cake

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Chocolate and pistachio biscotti

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Strawberry Tart

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Ham hock terrine

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Photo 27 Mar 18 notes I cannot resist reblogging this, basically my ideal lunch/snack.. gimme

I cannot resist reblogging this, basically my ideal lunch/snack.. gimme

via TKTC.

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